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15Jun/11Off

Book Review: Bossypants

You know Tina Fey, right? Writer and host of Weekend update for Saturday Night Live, actress and producer on 30 Rock, and reluctant Sara Palin impersonator. Bossypants is the result of the "hey, I should write a book!" urge that people like her get, and lucky for us it's as funny and well written as we could want. The book is autobiographical in nature, and follows the typical template of starting with her childhood, moving through adolescence, then young adulthood, early career, then current day. For some reason I thought the book was going to deal more with motherhood, but while that particular topic is present, it's no more so than others.

As you might expect, those other, accompanying topics are slapshot and almost random, and the book reads more like an extended blog than any kind of memoir. You get stuff on her dad, the time she spent surrounded by gay teens in a summer theater camp, her early days at SNL, her time with an improv troop, her wry description of a magazine cover photo shoot (probably my favorite chapter), her honeymoon, and others. But that's cool; I certainly wasn't looking for or expecting any kind of coherent narrative or theme to tie everything together. I just wanted to be amused. And for those of us who are fans of 30 Rock, there's a delightfully meaty serving of inside baseball (is that a weird mixing of metaphors?) that describes getting that show off the air and the creators' pleased amazement over its eventual success.

And, as I said, it's all pretty amusing. Fey has a great, wry, and piercing sense of humor that couples well with the familiar staple of self deprecation. She makes fun of herself constantly, seizing on her shortcomings and using them to bludgeon the reader into amusement. It also works in that once she does turn her sights on other targets, like answering particularly insipid reader e-mails and messageboard posts, she doesn't come off as arrogant or superior. It's more like she and the reader are sharing a sidelong "Oh my god, can you believe this?" kind of understanding. It's also notable that this version of Fey is a lot more raunchy and lewd than you might be used to if you've only experienced her through the filters of network television. Not that it's all potty jokes, but there's a few pointed jokes about things like sex, religion, menstruation, and homosexuality. Oh, and there's also an extended bit about jars full of urine, so I guess there is some bathroom humor too. But it's all pretty funny.

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